Page from the AIM

This spring does several things: 1) It brings the clutch pedal up, and holds it up, when not in use. 2) It actually helps you push the clutch pedal down when you use the clutch. It does this because it is an “over center” spring arrangement. That is, it resists your foot movement during the first 50% of the downward travel of the clutch pedal, and then it aids your foot during the last 50% (when you  are compressing the springs in the clutch itself). The two plated bolts shown in Photo 1 are used to adjust this “over center” feature. It is very important that you follow the procedures shown in the shop manual for this and the other adjustments to the clutch linkage.




































Click to download file

Cluch Spring Replacement.pdf













































Photo 6 - The spring shown in the proper position

Photo 5 - Tap the retainer pin down into its hole until it snaps into place

Photo 4 - Place the retainer pin over the tang of the spring

Photo 3 - Grease the threads of the tool and turn the nut to draw the spring into position for the retainer (which has been removed)

Photo 2 - The tool loosely assembled and ready for use

Photo 1 - Attach the spring to the bell crank with its attachment plate

Photo B

Photo A

1956-62 Clutch Return Spring Replacement


In automotive design, springs are used for various purposes all through the body and chassis. Many of these springs can be removed or replaced with simple hand tools

(eg. brake return springs) while others must be handled using special tools. In the dealership, these special toolsare often available, but for those of us who are less

fortunate, another method must be devised. In an earlier aiticle, I showed a method of installing therear leaf springs. In this case I should like to share with you a simple tool I devised for the installation ofthe clutch return spring.If the clutch linkage is to be repaired or replaced, the return spring must be removed and then later re-installed.


This spring is too stiff to be pulled open by hand, so the use of a tool is required. To pry a spring as stiff as this one could easily cause damage or injury. I noticed that there is

a hole in the frame which is lined up exactly with the lower end ofthe spring. This hole must have been used in the factory to hook up a puller to do this job. I was able to

make such a tool from a 1/2" x 7-1/2" N.C. bolt, a piece of 3/4" water pipe about 3" long (thick wall, schedule 80), a piece of 1/4" thick steel plate (from which I made the hook), and a 3/8" bolt (used to make the mushroom pin which fits into the hole in the frame) See photos A & B.


PHOTO 1 - Attach the spring to the bell crank with its attachment plate as shown. 


PHOTO 2 - The tool loosely assembled and ready for use is shown here. (mushroom pin in hole)


PHOTO 3 - Grease the threads of the tool and turn the nut to draw the spring into position for the retainer pin (which has been removed).

CORVETTE TIPS AND TECHNIQUES